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Emeritus and Retired Faculty

Robert Cole
Robert Cole

Bob Cole taught at USU for 41 years before retiring in 2011. He received his BA from Ottawa University, MA from Kansas State University, and PhD from Claremont Graduate University. Elected a fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 1994, Cole published widely on the history of war and propaganda, including ten books and dozens of articles. He taught courses on Modern Britain, Modern Europe, Imperial Paris, as well as seminars on Propaganda and Censorship, and Film Propaganda. Cole was co-founder and first president of the Western Conference on British Studies, and a guest lecturer at multiple universities and colleges around the world.  

Denise Conover
Denise Conover
denise.conover@gmail.com

After receiving her PhD in American diplomatic history at Washington State University in 1978, Denise Conover taught in Washington state, Indiana, and Connecticut. She moved with family to Logan, Utah in 1991 and taught at Weber State University before joining USU in 1993. For the next twenty years, she taught a variety of introductory upper-division courses, including courses on World War II in Europe, World War II in Asia, and the Cold War. Since her retirement in 2013, Conover has spent much of her time traveling to both coasts to visit family. She remains passionately devoted to historical study.

 

Ed
R. Edward Glatfelter
ed.glatfelter@usu.edu

After 43 years on the faculty, Ed Glatfelter retired from USU’s Department of History in 2013. A specialist in Russian and Chinese history, he served as Department Head of History from 1984 to 1994, and as an Associate Dean of the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences from 1994 to 2012. In the 1980s he established the International Student Exchange Program at USU. He served as chair of the Scholarly Publications Committee of the USU Press for over 20 years and co-founded USU’s Asian Studies Program, which he subsequently directed. From 1989 to 2007, he was Executive Dean of the University of Pittsburgh’s Semester at Sea program for six voyages. He traveled, taught and studied in China, spending a year as Visiting Scholar at the Academy of Social Science of Shanghai, and served as president of both the Rocky Mountain Association for Slavic Studies and the Western Social Science Association. Since retirement he has continued work on translation projects, enjoyed spending the winters in California, and traveled as much as possible.

David Rich Lewis
David Rich Lewis
david.r.lewis@usu.edu

David Rich Lewis did his undergraduate work at Utah State University, earned an MA at the University of Toronto, and completed his PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He returned to the USU History faculty in 1988 until his retirement in 2017. Lewis published widely on the history of contemporary Native American environmental issues, economic development, and sovereignty. Beginning in 1992, he joined the editorial team of the Western Historical Quarterly, serving as its editor from 2003 to 2016. A successful teacher of large American history surveys as well as smaller research-driven Utah history classes, he is currently putting those skills to work as general editor on a new college-level Utah history textbook.



 

Mick Nichols
Michael Nicholls
michael.nicholls@usu.edu

Michael Nicholls joined the History Department in the fall of 1970 and retired in 2007. He taught History 170 and later the first half of the American history survey. His upper-division courses primarily focused on American history before 1800, American slavery, and History 499, which he helped develop. For several years he taught the graduate research seminar and served as the department’s director of graduate studies. In 2012 the University of Virginia Press published Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel’s Conspiracy which won the Library of Virginia’s 2013 People’s Choice Award for non-fiction. Since retirement he has also published articles in the Journal of Southern History, Slavery and Abolition, and the Virginia Magazine of History. In the fall of 2017 Colonial Williamsburg opened a barbershop in the restored area depicting Caesar Hope, “The famous barber of York,” based on his research.

Robert McPherson
Robert McPherson
bob.mcpherson@usu.edu

Robert S. McPherson, Professor of History and Utah State Historical Society Fellow, retired after thirty-six years of teaching for the College of Eastern Utah and USU. His area of specialty and research interests are in Native American history and the Four Corners region. He has published nineteen books, four monographs, thirty-eight articles, and is currently working on a book on northern Navajo history and a second work on traditional teachings of a Navajo medicine man.

 

Ross Peterson
F. Ross Peterson
ross.peterson@usu.edu

Dr. F. Ross Peterson, a native of Montpelier, Idaho, graduated from USU with a degree in History. He received his PhD in American Studies from Washington State University in 1968. After three years at the University of Texas at Arlington, he returned to USU in 1971 where he served as Professor of American history for thirty-three years. In 1986, he established the Mountain West Center and served as its director for over a decade. He was President of Deep Springs College in California from 2004-2007 before returning again to USU as Vice President for Advancement, where he helped conduct the University's first comprehensive campaign. Author of numerous books on the American West, Ross maintains that his great love is teaching. In 1998, Governor Michael Leavitt and Utah Humanities Council presented him with the Governor's Outstanding Humanist Award for the state of Utah, and in 2015 he was named the Wayne Aspinall Chair in Western history at Colorado Mesa University. Ross and his wife, Kay, are the parents of three married sons and have eleven grandchildren. 

charles prebish
Charles Prebish
charles.prebish@psu.edu

Charles Prebish held the Charles Redd Endowed Chair in Religious Studies at Utah State University from 2007 until 2010. Previously, he taught at the Pennsylvania State University for 35 years. His specialty is Buddhist Studies, and he is the author or editor of two dozen books and nearly 100 refereed articles and chapters. He is the founding Co-Editor of the Journal of Buddhist Ethics and the Journal of Global Buddhism. He was an officer in the International Association of Buddhist Studies and Co-Founded the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion. In 2005 he was honored by his colleagues with a "festschrift" volume titled Buddhist Studies from India to America: Essays in Honor of Charles S. Prebish. In his retirement he continues to publish books and articles on early Indian Buddhism and Buddhism in the Western World.

 

Len Rosenband
Len Rosenband
leonard.rosenband@aggiemail.usu.edu

Len Rosenband was a member of the history department from 1983 to 2015. He taught the survey of Western Civilization, an advanced course on the Age of the French Revolution, the senior seminar, and the graduate seminar in historiography. In 2014, he received the American Historical Association's Nancy Lyman Roelker Mentorship Award. He is the author of Papermaking in Eighteenth-Century France: Management, Labor, and Revolution at the Montgolfier Mill, 1761-1805. This book appeared in French translation in 2005. Rosenband also coedited two books and published many articles in a broad range of leading historical journals. His most recent article, "The Industrious Revolution: A Concept Too Many?," appeared in International Labor and Working Class History. He is currently writing a comparative history of French and English papermaking during the eighteenth century.